Tag Archives: short stories

Flash Fiction – Two Days Away! Atten-hut!

army dog_editedWhat could be better after a catastrophic hurricane than a daylong immersion in creative writing? Not much! If you agree, join us on Saturday, Sept. 22 at Central Carolina Community College in Pittsboro for a madcap adventure into the exciting world of flash fiction.

Yes, it’s a bootcamp, but it’s also going to be fun! Get ready for new prompts, new inspiration, and instant feedback. We have six fabulous exercises planned, from “Wacky Word Play” to “Coffee, Tea or Me” – a fictional restaurant review. (This little dog’s tongue is hanging out just thinking about it.) All prompts are designed to stimulate your imagination and bring to life six original short fictions you’ve written yourself!

We have just a few slots left so if you haven’t signed up yet, don’t delay. Sign up here and see you on Saturday. Atten-hut!

 

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A Night of Storytelling in Pittsboro!

mighty ant reading.jpgFrom tales of raising Rameses (the UNC Mascot ram) to a first Mustang to warm biscuits on a blue Cameron woodstove, last night’s reading from the Mighty Ant Anthology, Short Stories for Seniors, spilled over with fun. It was like a cup of sugar you borrowed from your neighbor, just what you needed to finish a cake. 🙂

Jessica Bryan, the anthology editor and author of several stories in the book, emceed the event and led a scintillating discussion among the panel of writers and attendees on the stories that we all remind ourselves to write down before it’s too late. Sweet tea, homemade pound cake, and fresh Dahlias from Ruth Moose’s garden added the perfect finishing touch to a summer evening in the South.

Proceeds from the book will support The Chatham Council on Aging, so I encourage you to check it out and order your copy today.

Interested in writing your own flash fictions? If so, consider joining us for a special workshop at the Central Carolina Community College in Pittsboro later this month and in October. Hope to see you at one or both!

September 22, 2018: Flash Fiction Bootcamp. Think you don’t have time to write? Anybody has time for flash fiction, and by the end of this class, you’ll have five finished pieces. Bring your favorite writing gear (notebook and pen/pencil or laptop) and get ready for some prompts, new inspiration, and instant feedback. Atten-hut!

October 13, 2018: Flash Fiction: Revision and Publication. Now that you’ve written your flashes, you’re ready to show them off! Bring a story of your own and learn how to revise, prepare and submit it for publication in online or print magazines, and how later to create a book-length collection and find publishers.

 

You’re Invited to Celebrate the Mighty Ant Anthology in Pittsboro!

Join us on Thursday, Sept. 6 at 6:30 p.m. at the Chatham County Agriculture and Conference Center in Pittsboro for a special event celebrating the release of the Mighty Ant Anthology, Short Stories for Seniors, which is now available on Amazon. The book features flash fiction intended for adults suffering from dementia, memory impairment, and those with compromised attention spans.

Anyone loving a good yarn will savor this book, which delivers crumb after crumb of literary satisfaction.

At the Sept. 6 event, several authors (including the editor, Jessica Bryan) will be reading from and signing copies of the book. I’ll be reading “A Cup of Sugar,” a short tale based on the adventures of a sleepwalking baker who runs out of sugar at midnight.

Proceeds from the book will support The Chatham Council on Aging, so I encourage you to check it out and order your copy today.

For more information on the event, see the event flyer.

Interested in writing your own flash fictions? If so, consider joining us for a special workshop at the Central Carolina Community College in Pittsboro later next month and in October. Hope to see you at one or both!

September 22, 2018: Flash Fiction Bootcamp. Think you don’t have time to write? Anybody has time for flash fiction, and by the end of this class, you’ll have five finished pieces. Bring your favorite writing gear (notebook and pen/pencil or laptop) and get ready for some prompts, new inspiration, and instant feedback. Atten-hut!

October 13, 2018: Flash Fiction: Revision and Publication. Now that you’ve written your flashes, you’re ready to show them off! Bring a story of your own and learn how to revise, prepare and submit it for publication in online or print magazines, and how later to create a book-length collection and find publishers.

 

Mighty Ant Anthology now available!

might antIn May, I participated in the “Story A Day” challenge to draft a new story each day of the month. Several of these stories turned out to be flash pieces and four were accepted for publication by Jessica Bryan, the editor of the Mighty Ant Anthology, Short Stories for Seniors, which is now available on Amazon. The book features flash fiction intended for adults suffering from dementia, memory impairment, and those with compromised attention spans.

Here’s a rundown of my stories:

  • “Lavender and Lilies” — based on a prompt featuring a mythological love triangle resolved through clever debate (Thank you, Fred White, author of The Daily Reader).
  • “While Planning the 55th Reunion of the Class of ’63, Kathryn Hunsucker Has a Conniption Fit.” You guessed it, this was inspired, albeit loosely, by my husband’s own high school reunion. Shhhh!
  • “A Cup of Sugar” — the tale of a sleepwalking baker who runs out of sugar at midnight. You might want to lock your doors tonight–or at least latch your pantry.
  •  “Eula Dare Hampton Agrees to Edit the Quaker Ladies’ Cookbook” (a shorter version of the same story that won third prize in the Carolina Woman Writing Contest and Honorable Mention in Women on Writing).

But this is just a taste of the stories (both fiction and nonfiction) offered. Anyone loving a good yarn will savor the title story (and others) by Editor Jessica Bryan, as well as stories from my writer-friends Mary Barnard and Anne Kissel and many others. The ant theme is woven beautifully throughout the book, delivering crumb after crumb of literary satisfaction.

Proceeds from the book will support The Chatham Council on Aging, so I encourage you to check it out and order your copy today.

 

Summer rain, summer magic

We woke up to bright sunshine, but in true July fashion, a sudden summer storm surprises us at Whale Tail Road. Perhaps my bougainvillea will dreamily shake her blossoms, Sara Teasdale-style.

Today two of my flash fictions make their appearance in the July 2018 issue of The Birds We Piled Loosely. Read “Etymology in the Neighborhood” and “We Are So Sorry”  by clicking on the cover of the magazine and scrolling to pages 15 and 25.

All of the work is distinctive in its own way, particularly poems by Emily Parker, Rich Ives, and Ally Young as well as evocative image-text pieces by Emma Sheinbaum.

This past month I’ve kept busy revising stories that I began in May’s “Story A Day” Challenge and already I’ve submitted several shorter pieces for publication.

Last week I wrapped up a one-week class offered by One Story: Write a Story with Hannah Tinti. I’ve taken online classes before but this was one of the most engaging I’ve ever experienced. It focused on structure, something I don’t always think about when in the heat of composing a story. And in just six days, all participants had the opportunity to craft, day by day, a solid draft with a viable structure. More importantly, it was FUN!

But today, as rain pounds our roof, I’m thinking more about poetry. I’m going to comb through my word boxes and see what magical combinations arise….I’ll be building dandelion suspension bridges, kitten-heeling my way into a sunset altar, and exploring the sovereignty of cookies.

Wrapping up the Story a Day challenge

I did it! Foblack raspberryr each day of May, I drafted a story every morning. This means I ended up with 31 rough drafts, more than enough to see me through a summer and fall of solid writing.

It wasn’t as easy as picking black raspberries, but I’m so glad I did it.  Most of the stories are still rough drafts but I now have at least 10 viable starts to longer pieces. And yes, looking back, there’s a little bit of “chaff” that may never see the light of day. Uh, what was I thinking?

So how did I do it? In the beginning, I leaned heavily on writing prompts from other sources. One of my more finished pieces is based on a mythological story–a love triangle resolved through clever debate (Thank you, Fred White, author of The Daily Reader.). Another one is based on a prompt from Story A Day, Write a Letter (Thank you, Julie Duffy).  I also pulled out a few latent ideas of my own that I’d been hoarding. Many ideas, however, seemed to just spawn themselves, a freaky synthesis of my own experience and writing mind, if that makes sense. One idea ended up yielding two separate stories!

Having worked on longer pieces for so long, I was a little out of the habit of generating new ideas. So I found the discipline of this effort extremely useful. As they say, we first make our habits, and then our habits make us. Not surprisingly, the more you write, the more ideas you get.

I also managed to make a little jam (strawberry and early peach). And yes, as another reward, I’ll  be treating myself to William Trevor’s collection of last stories very soon. And for now, I’ll be revising, revising, revising….

 

 

First cherries, first lines

cherriesOut of our four young cherry trees, we ended up with just a handful of tart cherries this year. Our Montmorency tree (left), the first one we planted three years ago, yielded the most fruit.

The first line of a story should be as memorable as the taste of a tart cherry–tangy, sweet, then tangy again. It’s almost lemony, but there’s something else–the flavor of early summer, morning breezes, balmy nights, the eerie song of the wood thrush in the hollow.

“One fine evening the no less fine office manager Ivan Dmitrich Cherviakov was sitting in the second row of the stalls, watching The Bells of Corneville through opera glasses.” (Anton Chekhov, The Death of a Clerk)

“Miss Matt was at least partially conscious that she looked like the teacher everyone has had for English in first-year high school; she was small and pretty, in a rice-powder fashion, with a great mass of soft dark hair that tried to stay on top of her head and straggled instead down over her ears; her voice was low and turned pleading instead of sharp; any presentable fourteen-year-old bully could pass her course easily.” (Shirley Jackson, The Sorceror’s Apprentice)

“Hazel Morse was a large, fair woman of the type that incites some men when they use the word ‘blonde’ to click their tongues and wag their heads roguishly.” (Dorothy Parker, Big Blonde)

Does your first sentence sing with vivid language? Mystery and intrigue? Does it draw your reader deeper? As I revise the stories I drafted this past month, I’ll be cognizant of the work of the masters in the first sentences of their stories, as quoted above. There’s a trick here, and these authors do it. That first sentence must hint at the plot and the universal truth (or unique vision) that caused the author to write the story in the first place.

As we approach the end of my story-drafting blitz this month, (three more to go!) I was delighted to receive a note from the editors of  The Birds We Piled Loosely, a hip online literary magazine, that they accepted two of my short humor flashes: “Etymology in the Neighborhood” and “We Are So Very Sorry” for their July issue.

Come to think of it, submitting work for publication is also a bit like growing cherries in the south. It’s unpredictable, a little scary, (will a late frost hurt those flower buds?) but the scarcity makes the few cherries you do harvest that much more delicious. So keep it up…both the cherry growing and submitting!