Tag Archives: date with neanderthal woman

Randolph Writers Rock Flash Fiction!

flash fiction picture

We had a marvelous time at the monthly gathering of Randolph Writers last night at the Asheboro Public Library! It was a lively evening of prompts, readings and discussion on one of my favorite topics–flash fiction!

There are so many things to adore about this wonderful genre. Flash fictions or “flashes” offer everything I adore about longer stories–characters, voice, plot, and imagery–but all within a very short space, and some flashes (like “Hint” fiction) are even less than 25 words! Writing flash fiction helps you master the art of compression, build a daily writing practice, and if you like, can lay the pipe for longer works such as a traditional short story or even a novel.

flashfiction2 We opened the evening with an instant prompt, and all the participants kindly indulged me by penning a story on a page from those old-fashioned pink message pads. Remember those? I was blown away by the creativity of all the writers, and their bravery at trying this unusual prompt.

The use of a message pad is an example of a “fixed-form narrative,” which is a very popular form for writers and readers.  Writers, if you’re stumped by how to accelerate a story, consider writing in it in the form of an email, a letter, a diary entry, or as suggested by our participants: a “purchase requisition” or a “new account” form!

We also delved into some longer works (between 250 – 1,000 words), and among others, explored the writing of Nancy Stohlman (“Death-Row Hugger”), Allen Goodman (“Wallet”), Heinrich Boller (“The Laugher”), and David Galef (“My Date with Neanderthal Woman.”) And even though we had only two hours together, we managed to squeeze out two more stories of our own, inspired by these authors. And then there was the bonus — all the laughter, joy, and maybe even a few misty eyes.

Another benefit, and perhaps the greatest benefit of all, is that flash fiction allows writers yet another way to share our stories with others. Because it’s shorter, it’s unusually accessible and unpretentious, thereby offering “instant community.” Writing is primarily a solitary act, but even so, the art must be fed by support and encouragement. If this sounds good to you, I hope you’ll consider attending (or even joining!) Randolph Writers. We meet on the third Tuesday evening of every month, and welcome writers of all levels.

Many thanks to my fellow Randolph Writers for allowing me to present, and particularly to President Sayword B. Eller, who is an accomplished writer (and MFA candidate!) herself. She regularly offers tips for all of us. Please check out her terrific podcast “About This Writing Thing” or her new Author Tube channel!

In the meantime, keep writing and delighting!
Ashley